Yung-Yao Lin

Title: Non-clinical Lecturer
BSc; PhD
Lecturer

My research focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophies. Briefly, muscular dystrophies are a group of inherited neuromuscular disorders characterised by progressive muscle degeneration, which may be associated neurological and cardiac defects. Currently there is no effective treatment. We are interested in developing cellular models for muscular dystrophies using the reprogramming and genome editing technologies to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and isogenic control cells. Cellular models derived from isogenic pairs of iPSC provide an invaluable resource for studying disease pathogenesis and facilitating chemical and genetic screens.

Bio

Dr Yung-Yao Lin grew up in Taiwan and obtained his BSc degree from National Taiwan University.

He conducted his PhD study in Prof Michael Ashburner’s laboratory (Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge), where he used fruit flies as the model organism to investigate molecular mechanisms governing planar cell polarity. During his postdoctoral training, he developed zebrafish models of muscular dystrophy in Dr Derek Stemple’s laboratory (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute).

In collaboration with Prof Francesco Muntoni (UCL Institute of Child Health) and Prof Hans van Bokhoven (Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre), Dr Lin made significant contributions in the field of neuromuscular disorders, particularly towards the demonstration of novel genes responsible for muscular dystrophies using zebrafish models. In 2012, Dr Lin was awarded an Early Career Research fellowship from Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry to set up his independent research group. He joined the Blizard Institute as a Lecturer in January 2013.

Research

Muscular dystrophies constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary neuromuscular disorders, characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting, which may be associated with central nervous system (CNS) and cardiac involvement. Currently there is no effective treatment. Different types of muscular dystrophy vary in the age of onset, severity and characteristic clinical features. Interestingly, a number of clinically similar conditions are mapped to distinct genomic loci. Conversely, allelic mutations in the same gene may give rise to a broad phenotypic spectrum, in which the severe and mild ends are clinically classified as different forms of muscular dystrophy.

 To date identified causative gene mutations for muscular dystrophies affect a functionally diverse set of proteins. One major focus is dystrophin and its associated proteins, termed the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC), which provides a mechanical linkage between subsarcolemmal proteins and basement membrane components. A central component of DGC is dystroglycan, which contains peripheral alpha and transmembrane beta subunits. Recent studies suggest that functional glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan is critical for maintaining muscle integrity.

 

Current research projects in the Lin lab include:

  1. Molecular mechanisms underlying allelic variants of muscular dystrophies
  2. Disease modeling using model organisms or isogenic pairs of control and patient-specific iPSC
  3. High-content chemical and genetic screens using isogenic control and patient-specific iPSC
  4. Development of novel therapeutic approaches

 Our major collaborators are Prof Francesco Muntoni (UCL Institute of Child Health), Dr Pentao Liu (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute), Prof Paul Chapple (William Harvey Research Institute), Prof Silvia Marino (Blizard Institute), Dr Sue Brown (Royal Veterinary College) and Dr Derek Stemple (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute).

Group Members

Current members

Dr Jihee Kim (PDRA)

Ms Amaia Paredes Redondo (PhD student)

 

Former members

Dr Beatrice Lana (PDRA)

Ms Kous Shah (Undergraduate student)

Mr Evangelos Konstantinidis (MSc student)

 

 

 

Publications

  1. Roscioli, T., Kamsteeg, E.J., Buysse, K., Maystadt, I., van Reeuwijk, J., van den Elzen, C., van Beusekom, E., Riemersma, M., Pfundt, R., Vissers, L.E., Schraders, M., Altunoglu, U., Buckley, M.F., Brunner, H.G., Grisart, B., Zhou, H., Veltman, J.A., Gilissen, C., Mancini, G.M., Delree, P., Willemsen, M.A., Ramadza, D.P., Chitayat, D., Bennett, C., Sheridan, E., Peeters, E.A., Tan-Sindhunata, G.M., de Die-Smulders, C.E., Devriendt, K., Kayserili, H., El-Hashash, O.A., Stemple, D.L., Lefeber, D.J., Lin, Y.Y.*, van Bokhoven, H.*, 2012. Mutations in ISPD cause Walker-Warburg syndrome and defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. Nature Genetics 44, 581-585. (*Joint senior corresponding author)

  2. Lin, Y.Y., White, R.J., Torelli, S., Cirak, S., Muntoni, F., Stemple, D.L., 2011. Zebrafish Fukutin family proteins link the unfolded protein response with dystroglycanopathies. Human Molecular Genetics 20, 1763-1775.

  3. Lin, Y.Y., 2012. Muscle diseases in the zebrafish. Neuromuscular Disorders : NMD 22, 673-684. (Invited review)


View all Yung-Yao Lin's Research Publications at: http://www.researchpublications.qmul.ac.uk

Teaching

MSc Regenerative Medicine

Problem Based Learning


Further information

Funding bodies:

  1. Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry
  2. Royal Society
  3. Newlife Foundation for Disabled Children

Contact

Centre for Genomics and Child Health

Blizard Institute

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry

Blizard Building

4 Newark Street

London E1 2AT

 

Tel: +44 (0) 207 882 2339
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.