Richard Hooper

Title: PhD
Reader in Medical Statistics

Since joining the Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit in 2010, Richard’s work has focused on the theory and practice of running clinical trials. His research interests centre on innovative approaches to clinical trial design, with the aim of improving efficiency. This work has led to publications in the British Medical Journal, the International Journal of Epidemiology, and Statistics in Medicine, among others. He has also written and distributed software (SimSam) that allows accurate and transparent sample size calculation in trial designs of any complexity, using simulation. More recently he has made important contributions in the field of stepped wedge trials (designs with a randomised delay in the introduction of an intervention at different sites) – an area that has seen an explosion of interest among statisticians, health researchers and funders.

Bio

After gaining his first degree in Maths in 1988, Richard studied statistics at the Cambridge University Statistical Laboratory and then had his first taste of medical research working at the Winnicott Research Unit (now based at Reading University), researching mother-infant interactions and postnatal depression. While working full-time at the Winnicott Research Unit, Richard also did a PhD in statistical pattern recognition.

Following his PhD, Richard moved to King's College School of Medicine & Dentistry (KCSMD) to work as a statistical consultant to researchers across the School and Healthcare Trust. An example of his collaborative research at King's was the PROFET trial, of a complex intervention to reduce the risk of falling in elderly people. Current practice at that time focused on the injury associated with a fall rather than underlying causes. PROFET showed that structured interdisciplinary assessment reduced the risks of subsequent falling and admission to hospital. Results appeared in the Lancet.

After the merger of KCSMD with the medical schools at Guy's & St Thomas', Richard re-located to Guy's in June 2000. He began working with the King's Centre for Military Health Research, leading to a number of publications on screening and prevalence of psychological problems in the military. Their BMJ cover-story in 2006 told how screening for mental disorders before the start of the 2003 Iraq war would not have reduced subsequent morbidity or predicted post-traumatic stress disorder. A paper Richard led which investigated exposure to traumatic events (in this case combat exposures) and subsequent alcohol and cigarette use was the first prospective study of this question, and is regularly cited.

In January 2006 Richard joined a new Respiratory Epidemiology group at Imperial College London. There he had a senior role at the coordinating centre of an international multi-centre study of risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The World Health Organisation predicts that COPD will become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2030. Although smoking is the primary cause, an estimated 25-40% of patients with COPD have never smoked. His analysis of risk factors using data from 14 international sites was published in 2012.

Since joining the Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit in 2010, Richard’s work has focused on the theory and practice of running clinical trials. His research interests centre on innovative approaches to clinical trial design, with the aim of improving efficiency. This work has led to publications in the British Medical Journal, the International Journal of Epidemiology, and Statistics in Medicine, among others. He has also written and distributed software (SimSam) that allows accurate and transparent sample size calculation in trial designs of any complexity, using simulation. More recently he has made important contributions in the field of stepped wedge trials (designs with a randomised delay in the introduction of an intervention at different sites) – an area that has seen an explosion of interest among statisticians, health researchers and funders.

Publications

Hooper R, Bourke L. Cluster randomised trials with repeated cross-sections: some alternatives to parallel group designs. BMJ 2015;350:h2925.

Martineau AR, Hanifa Y, Witt KD, Barnes NC, Hooper RL, et al. Double-blind randomised controlled trial of vitamin D3 supplementation for the prevention of acute respiratory infection in older adults and their carers (ViDiFlu). Thorax 2015;70:953-60.

Martineau AR, MacLaughlin BD, Hooper RL, Barnes NC, Jolliffe DA, et al. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial of bolus-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in adults with asthma (ViDiAs). Thorax 2015;70:451-457.

Martineau AR, James WY, Hooper RL, Barnes NC, et al. Vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ViDiCO): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial.  Lancet Respir Med 2014;3(2):120-130.

Bakolis I, Burney P, Hooper R. Principal components analysis of diet and alternatives for identifying the combination of foods that are associated with the risk of disease: a simulation study. Br J Nutrition 2014;112(1):61-69.

Hooper R, Bourke L. The dog-leg: an alternative to a cross-over design for pragmatic clinical trials in relatively stable populations. Int J Epidemiol 2014;43(3):930-936.

Hooper R, Froud RJ, Bremner SA, Perera R, Eldridge S. Cascade diagrams for depicting complex interventions in randomised trials. BMJ 2013;347:f6681.

Hooper R, Díaz-Ordaz K, Takeda A, Khan K. Comparing diagnostic tests: trials in people with discordant test results. Stat Med 2013;32(14):2443-2456.

Hooper R, Burney P. Cross-sectional relation of ethnicity to ventilatory function in a West London population. Int J Tuberculosis Lung Dis 2013;17(3):400-405.

Hooper R. Versatile sample size calculation using simulation. Stata Journal 2013;13(1):21-38.

Burney PGJ, Hooper RL. The use of ethnically-specific norms for ventilatory function in African-American and white populations. Int J Epidemiol 2012;41:782-790.

Hooper R, Burney P, Vollmer WM, McBurnie M. Gislason T, et al. Risk factors for COPD spirometrically defined from the lower limit of normal in the BOLD project. Eur Resp J 2012;39:1343-1353.

Burney PGJ, Hooper R. Forced vital capacity, airway obstruction and survival in a general population sample from the United States of America. Thorax 2011;66:49-54.

Hooper R, Heinrich J, Omenaas E, Sausenthaler S, Garcia-Larsen V, et al. Dietary patterns and risk of asthma: results from three countries in European Community Respiratory Health Survey-II. Br J Nutr 2010;103:1354-1365.

Martineau AR, Jolliffe DA, Hooper RL, Greenberg L, Aloia JF et al. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. BMJ 2017 in press.

Hooper R, Teerenstra S, de Hoop E, Eldridge S. Sample size calculation for stepped wedge and other longitudinal cluster randomised trials. Stat Med 2016;35:4718-4728.


View all Richard Hooper's Research Publications at: http://www.researchpublications.qmul.ac.uk

Teaching

Topics for PhD supervision:

Practical and theoretical issues in sample size calculation by simulation

Alternatives to parallel group trial designs using unidirectional cross-over

Trials of diagnostic testing strategies


Contact

Centre for Primary Care and Public Health
Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry
Yvonne Carter Building
58 Turner Street
Whitechapel
London E1 2AB
 

020 7882 7324
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